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  1. #1
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    2021 Season - Leavers and Stayers

    So the F1 organisation has put out their 2021 regulations amidst a foggy backdrop of unrevealing team bosses. The regulation is drafted unlike any before it with a few areas of broad specification. The promoters has been very open and vivid about the need to develop the regulation over a number of seasons. The main supporters of the regulation were very vocal about the merits of the intentions of the regulation. Some supportive media have lost sight of their objectivity and posted their colours on the mast of this new regulations. It all looked proper and final except the unmistakable presence of the quiet voices of the teams.

    The problem is, we are not seeing any team jumping up with joy and singing their praises for the new regulation. While this is not entirely unusual, as the teams would usually be pouring over every aspect of the regulations with a fine tooth comb. The absence of clear and loud support from the teams leaves the whole affair with an air of unresolution.

    This thread is about gauging which teams might leave the formula and which teams might stay regardless.

    As an armchair expert, my guess is that the new regulation may not meet the aspirations of manufacuturer teams that use F1 as a research program for their automotive business. But F1 as an advertising medium may still be attractive to them. Hence running a works team under the 2021 regulations may not be lucrative anymore but a partnership with a strong customer team for a strong f1 advertising presense may be a workable approach for them.

    Current advertising teams like Redbull, Racing Point, Alfa Romeo and Williams may be inclined to stay whatever the form of the regulations. They can achieve their aspirations regardless of the characteristics of the formula. All they require is adequate media exposure.

    Privateer teams with deep history in the formula such as Mclaren and Williams may continue to race in the new formular particularly if it gives them the opportunity to win championships again.

    Hence, it would seem the midfield would most likely be intact and happily sign up for the new regulations. The question remains whether Mercedes, Ferrari, Renault and Honda would remain in the formula after the 2020 season.

    I wonder if there is any other racing formula that could give the manufacturer teams the opportunity to operate their research programs as the old F1 did for them? The endurance racing platforms may meet their requirements.
    Last edited by Nitrodaze; 11th February 2020 at 04:51.
    Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.
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  2. #2
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    Merc edes has taken the pain to state that they plan to stay in the formula but have unanswered questions it seems.
    Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.
    William Shakespeare

  3. #3
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    I think it's a given the top teams will continue, but are the lower level teams really in it for the R&D opportunities? F1 used to be all about that, but it's definitely moved away from that sort of thing in recent years. If you look at where road car technology is; which is mostly going towards full electric propulsion, F1 isn't at the forefront of technology, if anything it's having to play catchup to match what's going on in the real world.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    I think it's a given the top teams will continue, but are the lower level teams really in it for the R&D opportunities? F1 used to be all about that, but it's definitely moved away from that sort of thing in recent years. If you look at where road car technology is; which is mostly going towards full electric propulsion, F1 isn't at the forefront of technology, if anything it's having to play catchup to match what's going on in the real world.
    Quite true actually. The F1 hybrid engine is not a true fuel saving solution as such. The electric aspect of the engine is only used to boost the speed of the car. Not a part time electric car in the Panamera sense of the word. This electric boost technology has made its way into some roadcars. Most notably the recent Mercedes cars. A thorough look at what they had to offer from a fuel economy standpoint would reveal that they are not a very useful feature from a practical everyday driving perspective.

    The 2021 regulations fail woefully on this front. It has not addressed the technology aspect of the sport but has emphasis on the entertainment side of things. So the next era of F1 cars may be fast and entertaining but may most likely be grossly irrelevant with respect to where the automotive industry is heading.

    So l take your point and appreciate your insight.
    Last edited by Nitrodaze; 11th February 2020 at 17:24.
    Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.
    William Shakespeare

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