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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bagwan View Post
    "tactically taking air off an opponents front wing" is the central point I am making in this thread .
    If you steal the air , and you're too close to him he may hit you , whether you leave the rules-required one car width or not .

    In no way does that absolutely absolve the guy following from guilt in the incident , however , it does show that the guy ahead has his role in creating the low pressure that causes it .


    One question here now comes to mind .
    Who were the drivers in the Seb/Valterie and Kimi/Lewis tangles who were the ones making the passes ?
    Bagwan, it cuts both ways. Drivers of cars behind know they are susceptible to losing their downforce at the front while trying to pass cars in front at a chicane. It is part of the weakness of being behind without the aid of battery boost etc. Removing the air that provide downforce to the car behind is a risky but highly effective defensive tactics. It is not stealing it a such but merely depriving the car behind of it strategically. No rules against it and there should not be one l think.
    Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.
    William Shakespeare

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitrodaze View Post
    Bagwan, it cuts both ways. Drivers of cars behind know they are susceptible to losing their downforce at the front while trying to pass cars in front at a chicane. It is part of the weakness of being behind without the aid of battery boost etc. Removing the air that provide downforce to the car behind is a risky but highly effective defensive tactics. It is not stealing it a such but merely depriving the car behind of it strategically. No rules against it and there should not be one l think.
    It does , Daze (sorry , couldn't resist) .
    It does cut both ways .

    Drivers ahead take the risk if they go around the outside whilst making a pass , and that risk is made more severe the closer in they chose to position their car .
    Driver being passed around the outside take the risk that the opposition will leave them enough undisturbed air to come down to a speed at which they can negotiate the corner inside , in that space which is technically allowed .

    The race for that corner was won by Bottas , who , but for a few feet more room , would have sailed it through the next corner ahead easily .
    And , Sebastian might have been properly compromised , as Valterie had planned , onto the marbles mid-corner , leaving him vulnerable to the guy behind him .

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