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  1. #21
    Senior Member OldF's Avatar
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    Homologated parts were used also during the group A era but it was for sure easier for a privateer to have an almost factory level car. The parts that needed homologation was mainly transmission, suspension, brake and steering parts. All the engine related parts were either free or original. Dampers and springs were also free. Also the basic cars were also “half way” made rally cars.

    The FIA’s historic database is very nice.

    Toyota Celica ST-205
    http://historicdb.fia.com/sites/defa...21_group_a.pdf

    Ford Escort RS Cosworth
    http://historicdb.fia.com/sites/defa...66_group_a.pdf

    On pages 124 – 142 are parts homologated for the world rally car.
    “Don’t eat the yellow snow” Frank Zappa

  2. Likes: bf1_IRL (29th July 2017),Rally Power (24th July 2017)
  3. #22
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    Very interesting debate on the latest Absolute Rally podcast about this FYI.

    Of course, nothing is set in stone, far from it. Mahonen needs to lock it down before speaking, perhaps.

  4. #23
    Senior Member Fast Eddie WRC's Avatar
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    What I dont really get is which WRC team would get the best young driver(s) that reach that next step on the ladder.

    They are run by a manufacturer or private company, so they wont like having a new driver imposed on them. And which driver goes where ? Would the best go to the best team or the worst performing team ?

    I foresee this all causing too many issues.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldF View Post
    Homologated parts were used also during the group A era but it was for sure easier for a privateer to have an almost factory level car. The parts that needed homologation was mainly transmission, suspension, brake and steering parts. All the engine related parts were either free or original. Dampers and springs were also free. Also the basic cars were also “half way” made rally cars.

    The FIA’s historic database is very nice.

    Toyota Celica ST-205
    http://historicdb.fia.com/sites/defa...21_group_a.pdf

    Ford Escort RS Cosworth
    http://historicdb.fia.com/sites/defa...66_group_a.pdf

    On pages 124 – 142 are parts homologated for the world rally car.
    Old F, i will give you a big wet kiss when we meet one day. Thank you for those homologation papers.
    They will get printed and added to Saab V4 Group 1, Gp2, Gp4, Group A and Ford Capri Group A, and Opel Kadett E GSI...always great reading...
    John Vanlandingham
    Sleezattle WA, USA
    Vive le Prole-le-ralliat

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Eddie WRC View Post
    What I dont really get is which WRC team would get the best young driver(s) that reach that next step on the ladder.

    They are run by a manufacturer or private company, so they wont like having a new driver imposed on them. And which driver goes where ? Would the best go to the best team or the worst performing team ?

    I foresee this all causing too many issues.
    I didn't read anything about drivers being forced into factory WRC teams at the end of it? I guess all you can do is get the talented drivers to the table. Someone still needs to then offer them a seat. Same as in F1, or the NFL.

    If the FIA is serious about young driver progression then they should adopt the idea I and a few others have had, where you reserve that third WRC car for drivers either under a certain age, or (my preference) with a limited amount of WRC car drives. Then the manufacturers simply have to offer opportunities to young drivers and it's in their interest to develop them prior to that.

    Then after a couple of seasons that young driver could be moved into one of the other two seats, and it's time for a new guy to get a chance. If manufacturers don't want to risk this young driver for manufacturer points then they can just enter a fourth car for the Sordo's of this world if they really want.
    Last edited by Simmi; 22nd July 2017 at 09:13.
    My rally photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/94998505@N03/albums

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by janvanvurpa View Post
    Old F, i will give you a big wet kiss when we meet one day. Thank you for those homologation papers.
    They will get printed and added to Saab V4 Group 1, Gp2, Gp4, Group A and Ford Capri Group A, and Opel Kadett E GSI...always great reading...
    Hörru Janne! It´s about time for you to come to the mysterious nordic. No need for wet kisses.
    "Reis vas pät pat kaar vas kut"
    Tommi Mäkinen, back in the years...

  8. Likes: pantealex (22nd July 2017)
  9. #27
    Senior Member Fast Eddie WRC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simmi View Post
    I didn't read anything about drivers being forced into factory WRC teams at the end of it? I guess all you can do is get the talented drivers to the table. Someone still needs to then offer them a seat. Same as in F1, or the NFL.

    If the FIA is serious about young driver progression then they should adopt the idea I and a few others have had, where you reserve that third WRC car for drivers either under a certain age, or (my preference) with a limited amount of WRC car drives. Then the manufacturers simply have to offer opportunities to young drivers and it's in their interest to develop them prior to that.

    Then after a couple of seasons that young driver could be moved into one of the other two seats, and it's time for a new guy to get a chance. If manufacturers don't want to risk this young driver for manufacturer points then they can just enter a fourth car for the Sordo's of this world if they really want.
    I was just taking the 'ladder' to it's logical conclusion.

    But your theory sounds like a good idea and quite similar to what we have seen recently anyway.

  10. #28
    Senior Member PLuto's Avatar
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    Jarmo Mahonen is absolutely out of reality, like lot of other people at FIA. They are not able to provide regulations and system of homologations for rallysport which should be useful. To build/homologate new car is very expensive, thats why we have not so many new cars. Since Opel Adam there is no new R2 car because FIA is not able to provide what will be future of R2 cars. R3 category was "killed" by promoting R3T, because turbo cars are more expensive than classic atmospheric R3 cars for run. And now that stupidity with R4 kit, which is as base idea not so bad, but it was destroyed from the beginning of the project.

  11. #29
    Armchair General Mirek's Avatar
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    Sorry Pluto but You are wrong at one thing. The regulations MUST go with turbo cars because there are nearly no naturally aspirated engines left in stock production. For example neither VAG, nor PSA nor Ford has naturally aspirated 1.6 engine anymore!
    Stupid is as stupid does. Forrest Gump

  12. Likes: pantealex (24th July 2017)
  13. #30
    Senior Member PLuto's Avatar
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    I know. But turbo 2WD cars (especially R2T) are boring to watch and also to drive. But main problem is that FIA is still not able to make regulations for future. Thats the main reason why there are no new R2 cars...

  14. Likes: pantealex (24th July 2017)

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