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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robinho
    I remember a year when Dave Metcalfe took a Nova GTE to 4th on the Manx rally against much more potent machinery

    Sent from North Korea using the dark network
    1992 manx
    he also finished 4th in that years ulster one hell of a driver

  2. #22
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    As in all lists of motorsport accomplishments, the name Tazio Nuvolari warrants consideration. Any number of his drives might qualify for this question, but I would nominate his drive in the 1947 Mille Miglia.
    A very unlikely combination of aged driver and new car, Nuvolari and the Cisitalia 202 Spyder were 8 minutes ahead at Rome. A thunderstorm drowned the electrics causing valuable time, but Nuvolari powered on to finish 2nd by about 16 minutes to Biondetti's much larger Alfa. All this from a very sick 55 year old body. Even then he wasn't finished having a final go in 1948 for Ferrari.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by D28
    As in all lists of motorsport accomplishments, the name Tazio Nuvolari warrants consideration. Any number of his drives might qualify for this question, but I would nominate his drive in the 1947 Mille Miglia.
    A very unlikely combination of aged driver and new car, Nuvolari and the Cisitalia 202 Spyder were 8 minutes ahead at Rome. A thunderstorm drowned the electrics causing valuable time, but Nuvolari powered on to finish 2nd by about 16 minutes to Biondetti's much larger Alfa. All this from a very sick 55 year old body. Even then he wasn't finished having a final go in 1948 for Ferrari.
    Just to add that the Cisitalia was an 1100cc car.
    Duncan Rollo

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  4. #24
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    Speaking of Nuvolari, his drives that came up short in two events during 1933, Monaco and Tripoli, were both excellent drives, either one of which could/would/should have been victories.

    The Alan Kulwicki drive in the 1992 season finale at Atlanta was a great, heads-up drive, Kulwicki doing exactly what was needed, something very easy to say or plan, but very hard to actually do.

    Jim Clark's recovery from his bone-headed moment on the grid in the 1962 German GP was an incredible effort; one can only imagine what it might have been had he left with everyone else.... Or had the Type 23 not had problems in the 1000 km race earlier in the season.
    Popular memory is not history.... -- Gordon Wood

  5. #25
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    How about Fangio's drive in the 1953 Mille Miglia in an Alfa Romeo 'Disco Volante' coupe. He was leading the race by about two minutes until shortly after half distance when the chassis broke and a steering rod became detached leaving him with only the right front wheel responding to the steering wheel. He carried on at slightly reduced speed. He found that under braking the disconnected left wheel would splay out so he had to resort to slowing the car on the gears. On the very last corner he failed to take the bend and hit a pile of straw bales head on. So he reversed across the finishing line to take second place some 12 minutes behind the winner and 18 minutes ahead of the 3rd placed car.
    Duncan Rollo

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  6. #26
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    Ivan Capelli at the Portuguese GP of 1988.

    Took an under-powered Judd engined Leyton House March to second, gaining on Prost in an MP4/4 in the closing stages.


    Of course, it could be that he was flattered by the car, just as Vettel supposedly is now, according to some.
    The curse of having the temerity to sit in an Adrian Newey creation. It is sad that a fine drive be diminished by a desire to undermine achievement.
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  7. #27
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    Georges Boillot, French Grand Prix, 4th of July 1914: in a Peugeot he made reputedly his best drive ever, trying to fight the superior Mercedes team. Lead for 15 laps, the car finally broke down on the last lap, and the man collapsed over the steering wheel, crying. Mercedes won 1-2-3. The next month the World War started, Boillot joined the flying corps, became an ace and was fatally shot down in 1916. So, as you see, I find it an epic drive partly for non-racing reasons.

  8. #28
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    Another great driver was from The Shoe when he was stuck in second gear I think it was yet still finished second. Was in 98 if I'm not mistaken?
    "But it aint how hard you hit, it's about how hard you can get hit, and keep moving forward. How much you can take, and keep moving forward. That's how winning is done." Rocky.

  9. #29
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    Sorry, was Spain 1994 Hill won the race by 24 seconds.
    "But it aint how hard you hit, it's about how hard you can get hit, and keep moving forward. How much you can take, and keep moving forward. That's how winning is done." Rocky.

  10. #30
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    Metcalfe was a gifted man, unbelievably quick in FWD cars, a sad loss.

    Loeb's first rally in the Xsara WRC, Sanremo 2001, by the end he was within a few seconds of the tarmac master of the time, Panizzi. A definite signal of intent.

    Sato's drive in Canada 2007.

    Andrew Nesbitt's drive on the Circuit of Ireland 2003, the incar footage is crazy

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